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The Department of Water and Sanitation says the Mogalakwena Bulk Water Supply project in Limpopo is progressing well.

The department recently took the media on a tour of the project to showcase the progress of the project.

Addressing the media, Limpopo’s Acting Regional Head, Lesiba Richard Tloubatla indicated that phase 1 of the project is estimated to be completed by October 2018.

A long term water infrastructure solution

The Mogalakwena Bulk Water Supply Project is part of the Olifants River Water Resources Development Project (ORWRDP) bulk infrastructure plan which makes provision for the construction of raw and potable water pipeline systems to the identified target areas.

“The objective of the Mogalakwena Water Master Plan is to develop and implement a holistic long term water infrastructure solution that will support the municipality’s development goals. It will unlock vast mining potential and support sustainable integrated human settlements,” Tloubatla explained.

“As phase 1 of this project is to completed, which is estimated to be around October this year, 234 415 people which is about 55 000 households will be getting water on a regular basis,” he added.

Vandalism and theft an issue

Tloubatla noted that the only challenge the department is currently facing is infrastructure theft and vandalism. “As you saw today the Guard house’s windows at Ga-Sekhaolelo were broken and the gate stolen, also the gates to the water tanks built at Phafola and Machikiri were also stolen.

“So we call on community members to understand that this infrastructure that is being built here is for their benefit, they are the ones who should jealously guard it against anyone who tries to steal or vandalise it,” he said.

The department also called on citizens to continue to save water. “The province’s dam level continues to slowly decline with this week sitting at 72.1%, compared to last year’s 72.06%. Water users in the province are encouraged to play their role in saving water to ensure that we do not run out of water,” the department said.

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